Robot dan Manusia
Investigating Models Of Social Development Using A Humanoid Robot PDF Print E-mail
Written by Rizki Noor Hidayat Wijayaź   

Brian Scassellati: MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA: http://www.ai.mit.edu/people/scaz/

Abstract

The evaluation of models of social and behavioral development is dificult in natural settings; ethical concerns, diculties in implementing experimental procedures, and diculties in isolating hypothesized variables make experimental evidence dicult or impossible to obtain. We propose the use of human-like robots as a testbed for the evaluation of models of human social development. Robotic implementation of human social models allows for unique opportunities to evaluate those models. In this paper, we review some of the implications of this proposal by examining a case study of an on-going project to implement an existing model of one aspect human social development, the development of joint attention behaviors.

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Designing A Humanoid Robot Face To Fulfill A Social Contract PDF Print E-mail
Written by Rizki Noor Hidayat Wijayaź   

Aaron Edsinger and Una-May O*Reilly Artificial Intelligence Lab, MIT ,

In building humanoid robots, we are also building in implicit expectations about the social abilities and interactions that the machine should exhibit. The morphology and aesthetic of the robot play a critical role in defining these expectations. Specifically, the robot face plays a paramount role in establishing the social competence of the machine, and in defining a social contract between the observer and the robot.

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Better Vision Through Manipulation PDF Print E-mail
Written by Rizki Noor Hidayat Wijayaź   

Giorgio Metta,DIST University of Genova Viale F. Causa, 13 16145 Genova, Italy :Paul Fitzpatrick, LIRA-Lab, MIT AI Lab 200 Technology Square Cambridge, MA 02139 US

Abstract For the purposes of manipulation, we would like to know what parts of the environment are physically coherent ensembles that is, which parts will move together, and which are more or less independent. It takes a great deal of experience before this judgement can be made from purely visual information. This paper develops active strategies for acquiring that experience through experimental manipulation, using tight correlations between arm motion and optic flow to detect both the arm itself and the boundaries of objects with which it comes into contact. We argue that following causal chains of events out from the robot*s body into the environment allows for a very natural developmental progression of visual competence, and relate this idea to results in neuroscience.

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A Gestural Language For A Humanoid Robot PDF Print E-mail
Written by Rizki Noor Hidayat Wijayaź   

Aaron Ladd Edsing er Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science on May 11, 2001, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Science in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Abstract This thesis describes work done at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory on the humanoid robot platform, Cog. Humanoid research has long been concerned with the quality of the robot*s movement. However, obtainingthe elusive tempo and grace of the human motor system has proven to be a very difficult problem. The complexity of controlling high degree of freedom (DOF) humanoid robots, combined with insights provide by neurophysiological findings, has lead researchers to look at motor primitives (Williamson 1996) as an organizing methodology. We propose a data-driven approach to motor primitives in building a motor language for Cog. The proposed model is implemented on Cogand applied to the task of human motor mimicry.

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Theory Of Mind For A Humanoid Robot PDF Print E-mail
Written by Rizki Noor Hidayat Wijayaź   

Brian Scassellati MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab 545 Technology Square - Room 938 Cambridge, MA 02139 USA http://www.ai.mit.edu/people/scaz/

Abstract.

If we are to build human-like robots that can interact naturally with people, our robots must know not only about the properties of objects but also the properties of animate agents in the world. One of the fundamental social skills for humans is the attribution of beliefs, goals, and desires to other people. This set of skills has often been called a *theory of mind*.

This paper presents the theories of Leslie [27] and Baron-Cohen [2] on the development of theory of mind in human children and discusses the potential application of both of these theories to building robots with similar capabilities. Initial implementation details and basic skills (such as finding faces and eyes and distinguishing animate from inanimate stimuli) are introduced. I further speculate on the usefulness of a robotic implementation in evaluating and comparing these two models.

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